Sensual chat bots


..great majority of robots were either machine-like, male-like or child-like for the reasons that not only are virtually all roboticists male, but also that fembots posed greater technical difficulties.Not only did the servo motor and platform have to be ‘interiorized’ (naizosuru), but the body [of the fembot] needed to be slender, both extremely difficult undertakings.In this myth a female statue is sculpted that is so beautiful that the creator falls in love with it, and after praying to Venus, the goddess takes pity on him and converts the statue into a real woman, Galatea, with whom Pygmalion has children.The first gynoid in film, the maschinenmensch ("machine-human"), also called "Parody", "Futura", "Robotrix", or the "Maria impersonator", in Fritz Lang's Metropolis is also an example: a femininely shaped robot is given skin so that she is not known to be a robot and successfully impersonates the imprisoned Maria and works convincingly as an exotic dancer.Though the term android refers to robotic humanoids regardless of apparent gender, the Greek prefix "andr-" refers to man in the masculine gendered sense. Robotess is the oldest female-specific term, originating in 1921 from the same source as the term robot.

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Probably most famous, however, is Pygmalion, one of the earliest conceptualizations of constructions similar to gynoids in literary history, from Ovid's account of Pygmalion.This research has been used to elucidate gender cues, clarifying which behaviors and aesthetics elicit a stronger gender-induced response.“Sweetheart”, shown with its creator, Clayton Bailey; the busty female robot (also a functional coffee maker) that created a controversy when it was displayed at the Lawrence Hall of Science at University of California, Berkeley Female robots as sexual devices have also appeared, with early constructions being crude.Such essentialist ideas may present as sexual or gender stereotypes.

Among the few non-eroticized fictional gynoids include Rosie the Robot Maid from The Jetsons.

Feminist critic Patricia Melzer writes in Alien Constructions: Science Fiction and Feminist Thought that gynoids in Richard Calder's Dead Girls are inextricably linked to men's lust, and are mainly designed as sex objects, having no use beyond "pleasing men's violent sexual desires".